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Sunday, May 21, 2017

Late May Daylilies

I had all sorts of plans to do some work in the garden this weekend, but unfortunately, my back is still complaining loudly after I slipped and fell on the tile floor a week ago.  So my weekend o' weeding turned more in to a weekend of wishing.  Wishing that I could get out there and pull weeds and wishing that I could plant some more zinnias as very few of them reseeded themselves this year.

I did get out with my camera and take some photos of the nameless daylilies that are blooming now.

I've got a couple of this lovely deep red one with yellow throats.



This little yellow one I'm pretty sure is a Stella d'Oro - it's quite small compared to the others, only about 8 inches tall and hasn't spread as as wide as the others (which need digging up and dividing)


This lovely peach colored one is the biggest, having a spread of about three feet.  It badly needs to be divided if I can ever get up the energy to do that much digging!


Here's another deep red one with a yellow throat, but the petals are a different shape to the one above, so it's not the same variety.


At one time, long ago, I had the names noted down as to what was growing where, but unfortunately over the years, that information has gone missing.  So these will always be nameless for me.

I still like them, whether or not they have a name :-)

Words and photographs by Jayne Wilson, Green and Serene, Jayne's Country Garden.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Nothing Lasts Forever

When we first moved into this house, in the summer of 2008, one of the things that attracted us to it, in addition to the small forest of trees surrounding the lot (now sadly gone) was the lush hedgerow all along the road that runs behind our back wall.



Myriad birds make their home in the hedgerow - sparrows, chickadees, red cardinals, blue jays and more. And because I knew it wouldn't last forever, that was a big incentive for me to try and create a wildlife habitat garden.

It hasn't been easy.  Underground utilities meant I couldn't create as wide a border as I wanted to.  Plus, there were so many roots from the (now dead and gone) pine trees, that it was virtually impossible to plant anything in certain areas.




But I did what I could and although there are some gaps (see below) that will probably always seem like eyesores to me, our back border, along with the hedgerow behind the wall created a nice back drop for the island beds and lawn.



The hedgerow features in just about every photo I have of the garden.



It's been a backdrop for the many photos I take of the birds who come for the birdseed buffet I put out on the wall (most of whom only have to fly across the road to feast).

So when this sign appeared in the gateway to the field, I felt heartsick.  I knew the time was coming when I would lose my beloved hedgerow and probably most of the beautiful birds who live in it.



The sign first showed up about three years ago and since then there have been all sorts of rumors about what was going in there.

Until recently, it was going to be a community of acreage homesites, but just recently, the developer applied for, and got permission to change the zoning to allow him to build some 200+ homes on much smaller "low maintenance" lots.

Several people from our neighborhood went along to the planning meeting and voiced concerns about additional traffic etc. but it seemed the City Council had already made up their minds.

I'm sure no one else really cares about the hedgerow and its inhabitants, but I just feel desperately sad at the thought of losing them.

Words and photographs by Jayne Wilson, Green and Serene, Jayne's Country Garden.